Paul Dalgarno, And You May Find Yourself – book reviews

And You May Find Yourself (2015. Sleepers Publishing) is the hilarious and harrowing account of an émigré in Melbourne, in search of a job so that his young family can live, and desperately at odds with his new-found role as a father and bread-winner. Living in his in-laws' lounge room with mounting disgust growing between him and his wife and a tenuous hold on an emotional connection with his two children, Paul's life is cramped, poor, and seemingly adrift from the future he thought he would have for himself. 

"A fascinating and startlingly frank exploration of contemporary masculinity." James Bradley, The Australian.

“Honest, raw, hilarious, melancholic. Impeccable writing. Compelling storytelling. Paul Dalgarno writes like The Blue Nile’s Paul Buchanan sings. Quite a ride.” Catherine Deveny, writer and comedian.

"In this unflinching examination of his life, Dalgarno grapples with his father's legacy and the dark side of being an Aberdonian." Fiona Capp, The Sydney Morning Herald.

"Haunting in its honesty. Dalgarno's depiction of the difficulties of a new country, new job and new family is compelling." Michelle See-Tho, The Daily Review.

"Dalgarno writes with hostility and anger, but the prose is often tender, and always candid […] Tiny tragedies are drawn with weight and sensitivity." Daniel Juckes, Australian Book Review.

"For proof that in capable hands drama does not need the largest of stages and that everyday lives contain multitudes, look no further." Edd McCracken, Book Riot.

"This story is as real as it gets and all with an internal soundtrack playing quietly in the background: When it comes it changes your life." Declan O'Reilly, Writerul Books.

"Whether it's dealing with a second-hand rustmobile for a car or grappling with the hateful relationship he has with his own dad, Dalgarno's candour is humbling." Thuy On, The Sunday Age.

"A moving book with moments of hilarity and a real ability to engage. [...] Paul’s book has changed me." Clint Greagen, author.

"Honest, entirely original, and often hilarious – one man’s coming to terms with his new country, and himself.” Gay Alcorn, Guardian Australia.

 

 

AND YOU MAY FIND YOURSELF IS AVAILABLE FROM:

Sleepers Publishing

Readings 

Amazon Australia

Amazon UK

Amazon USA

iBooks

Booktopia

And others ...

 

Connect with Paul on TwitterFacebookGoodreadsEmail

pauldalgarno.com

 

 

 

 

A naked writer on his first book or: how I learned to stop worrying and love the bum

A naked writer on his first book or: how I learned to stop worrying and love the bum

What I’m about to write might be obvious if you’ve ever published a book; if you haven’t, and have no intention of doing so, you can stop reading now. If you think you might write a book, or are in the process of writing your first, with a view to publication, it might be of passing interest. But even that’s not guaranteed. You can duck out here. I don’t mind. I really don’t.

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Interview with Paul Dalgarno on Writerful Books

Interview with Paul Dalgarno on Writerful Books

I’ve lived a life, since being a teen, where I believed in the idea of meritocracy, as sold by Tony Blair’s New Labour in the 90s. That has seen me try all sorts of things that would have traditionally been considered above my station, but it’s also led to the inevitable conclusion that meritocracy is a trick. Cultural capital – which I’ve never had much of – is the thing: without that, one way or another, you’re screwed.

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Ten questions for the author by the author

Ten questions for the author by the author

At no point – until I was told otherwise – did I think of And You May Find Yourself as a memoir. Over the course of my life I must have read, conservatively, 250 novels for every memoir – which is nothing against memoirs: that's just what I’m drawn to. Even though some of my favourite books are memoirs, the idea of me writing one, if I’d even considered it, would have seemed hopelessly self-indulgent.

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Pretending to die is fine in my book

Pretending to die is fine in my book

In the year since she pretended to die, I hadn't dreamt of my mum even once, but a year and a week after the fact  – which is to say, a few days ago – I did. 

In the waking hours beforehand I'd attended my Australian citizenship ceremony – an occasion of pride, introspection and and mounting hunger. The event was at 6:30pm, at Coburg Town Hall. On the drive there I was clock-watching. I had to get my citizenship certificate; it needed to go off without a hitch: I had to present it the following morning at the passport office to have even a fighting chance of getting a passport turned around within three working days so that I could fly to Chile, which on that same day had been hit by a massive earthquake.

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